What is the claim about?

"The Supreme Court has held that a group of Uber drivers are "workers", rather than self-employed contractors."

Leigh Day brought a claim on behalf of a group of Uber drivers (“the claimants”) and the Supreme Court confirmed that the claimants are workers and that they are therefore entitled to workers’ rights. As the claimants have now won their claim, we will argue that Uber should treat all drivers as workers going forward. However, only the drivers' who bring a legal claim will be entitled to compensation. As such, we are continuing to support drivers to bring claims against Uber to ensure they can access the benefits and protections offered to workers.

As a worker, you are entitled to certain benefits and protections, including:

  • The right to paid holiday
  • The right to receive the National Minimum Wage
  • Protection from unlawful deductions from wages (deducting money from your wages without a proper reason)
  • The right to raise concerns, such as health and safety, without the fear of being punished.

 


 

What is the claim worth?

"The average Uber driver will be entitled to around £12,000 in compensation if their claim is successful."

Based on the information we have so far, we think that the average Uber driver will be entitled to around £12,000 in compensation if the claim is successful.

We are claiming compensation for:

  • Back pay for holiday pay
  • Compensation if the driver received less than the National Minimum Wage
  • Uber driver compensation will only be available to drivers who join the claim

 


 

Have previous Uber drivers won their claim?

"Uber drivers, who succeeded at the Employment Tribunal, have now won in the Supreme Court and will be classed as workers"

We represented a group of Uber drivers (“the claimants”) in the Employment Tribunal, and the Tribunal ruling determined that Uber drivers could be classed as workers.

Uber appealed against the decision of the Employment Tribunal and subsequently against the decisions of the Employment Appeal Tribunal and the Court of Appeal. Uber's argument was not accepted at any stage.

Uber appealed to the Supreme Court on this issue and the hearing took place in July 2020. The Supreme Court is the final court of appeal in the UK for civil cases and, as such, this hearing was Uber’s final chance to argue that the claimants are not workers.

The Supreme Court handed down its judgment on 19 February 2021 and agreed with us that the claimants are workers. Following this ruling, we believe that Uber will struggle to deny that all of its drivers are workers and are therefore entitled to workers’ rights.

 


 

How is the claim being funded?

"We are acting for Uber drivers on a 'no win, no fee' basis."

We are acting for Uber drivers on a ‘no win, no fee’ basis. This means that you do not pay anything unless you win.

 

If the claim is successful, we will deduct 25% plus VAT from the Uber driver’s individual compensation.

As an example, if a driver receives £10,000 in compensation, we will take 25% (£2,500) plus VAT (£500).

 


 

How do I join the claim?

"You do not need to provide any documents to find out if you are eligible to join the claim."

Our sign up process is designed to be straightforward and transparent. Finding out if you are eligible to join the claim only takes a few minutes. 

Unlike other companies, we don't require you to provide any additional documents, such as tax returns, to find out if you’re eligible.

 


 

Will drivers be entitled to Uber holiday pay?

"Yes, the Supreme Court has held that the Uber drivers who brought claims are entitled to holiday pay."

The Supreme Court has ruled that Uber drivers who have brought claims are entitled to workers’ rights, and therefore they are entitled to holiday pay.

As well as the Uber holiday pay claim, drivers will also be entitled to receive the National Minimum Wage. It is likely that only drivers who join the claim will receive compensation for unpaid holiday pay.

Check your eligibility and join the claim

If you want to join the claim, the full terms are set out in our Damages Based Agreement, which you can review once you have checked your eligibility.
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